“Slivers of Life: A Collection of Short Stories” Now Just .99!

Sliver of Life: A Collection of Short Stories is now available for just .99 on Kindle for a limited time. Grab a copy before it’s over!

“There is no time to lose when crafting a short story. In order to hook the reader, the author must instantly bring the narrator’s voice to life and create a compelling drama. In each of the Slivers, Beem Weeks plunges us into an intimate emotional encounter faster than Alice down the rabbit hole.” –S. Rose, author of Bridge Ices Before Road

These twenty short stories are a peek into individual lives caught up in spectacular moments in time. Children, teens, mothers, and the elderly each have stories to share. Readers witness tragedy and fulfillment, love and hate, loss and renewal. Historical events become backdrops in the lives of ordinary people, those souls forgotten with the passage of time. Beem Weeks tackles diverse issues running the gamut from Alzheimer’s disease to civil rights, abandonment to abuse, from young love to the death of a child. Long-hidden secrets and notions of revenge unfold at the promptings of rich and realistic characters; plot lines often lead readers into strange and dark corners. Within Slivers of Life, Weeks proves that everybody has a story to tell—and no two are ever exactly alike.

 Slivers of Life

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2018 #RRBC WRITERS’ CONFERENCE & BOOK EXPO!

Three years into the conference game and RAVE REVIEWS BOOK CLUB is getting better and better at it!

Last year’s conference opened up such a wide window of opportunity for our members, as they got the chance to meet and mingle with fellow members they had never met before, and many of them went on to become closer colleagues during the past year.  Our books were introduced to a larger reading audience and our knowledge of the literary world, and all that it takes to become better in this field, increased ten-fold.  Now, almost a year later, we’re preparing to do it all again!

The theme of last year’s conference, “WHEN YOU KNOW BETTER, YOU PRODUCE BETTER,” could not have been tagged as anything else, as our members proved that they came, they listened, they learned, and then…they produced…better!  I know this because the growth of some of our members in their writing has been incredulous, to say the least.  So, we began to wonder how we could improve on what we offered in 2017.

Deciding to continue along the same path, it was clear that the theme of this year’s conference “RISING TO STAND AMONG THE VERY BEST,” would surely catapult our members even further into the realm of successful authorship!  The resources that will be offered and the knowledge that will be gained from this year’s conference, will serve as the catalyst to ensure that each person who attends, will be that much closer to their goal of either “aspiring writer” or “successful author.”

Just as last year…

THIS YEAR’S EVENT WILL HELP YOU…
*Get inspired and get to writing more

*Market your work to avid readers
*Strengthen your writing skills even more and allow you to…
*Network with like-minded individuals who can aid you on your writing journey.

This year’s sessions and workshops are on many different topics that today’s writers and Authors are hungry to learn more about.  Our week-long event will be the perfect opportunity for you to soak up all that you can from those who are expert in their field of presentation.   With topics such as:  SHOW DON’T TELL:  LETTING YOUR READERS SEE IT FOR THEMSELVESKEEPING IT SIMPLE – HOW NOT TO OVERWHELM YOUR READERSBOOK CLUB ETIQUETTE“KILL YOUR DARLINGS” – SAYS STEPHEN KING.  WHY EVERY STORY NEEDS DEATH and so many more topics that would be of interest to any and everyone in the field of literature!

There will be several Author Booths on site for RRBC members to showcase, promote and sell their books, and Vendor Booths for those who wish to showcase and introduce their services.  No event is ever complete without giveaways, so allow me to mention that our RAFFLE this year is going to be just as good (if not better) than last year’s, and made fully possible by our ever-generous (member) SPONSORS!  We will be raffling 7 gift card/gift baskets – one for every day of the conference and there will also be door prizes up for grabs in every Author Booth!

Yes, all of this education, fellowship and fun in ONE place…and the best part is, you get to enjoy it all from the comfort of your very own home, or wherever you have an internet connection!

Ooops, there’s that word again…FUN!  How could I have left out mention of that wonderfully FUN RRBC SCAVENGER HUNT we had last year?  Well, get ready, because we’re bringing it back and it will be even MORE FUN and brain-challenging than the last go-round!!!!

This event will be held for one full week beginning August 12 and ending on August 18, 2018.

If you are an Author and have books releasing this year or have newly released books, this event is a great venue to debut them, so don’t miss out on getting your Author Booth!

Once again…

WELCOME!  WELCOME!  WELCOME!!

REGISTRATION OPEN NOW!

***This event is open to the general public***

*RRBC – RAVE REVIEWS BOOK CLUB

*RWISA – RAVE WRITERS – INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF AUTHORS

*THE RRBC PIPELINE MAGAZINE

Choose “The Alternative” Blog Tour With Suzanne Burke!

Greetings and welcome to another stop on author Suzanne Burke’s blog tour in support of her latest novel. Take it away, Suzanne…

Welcome to Day 7  of my Choose “THE ALTERNATIVE” Blog Tour.

With my grateful thanks to my marvelous host.

Thank you for joining me here.

BLURB

There are those that cling unreservedly to the lifeboat that believing in Karma hands them so willingly.

They work, they live, and they function in a world that allows them the option of unreservedly trusting that Karma has no deadline.

Until they are handed the spark that ignites them into becoming the instrument of Karma itself.

There are others who have had all they once held to be truths, everything they once stood for and took pride in, torn apart and ripped from them by the hand of a cruel fate.

Then, of course, there are those who believed in nothing and no one, to begin with …

These are their stories.

The stories of people both good and bad, who made the choice to exact “The Alternative.”

***

My fiction works are character driven.

Today I share with you a character interview with FBI Special Agent, Meredith Adams. A pivotal character from Chapter 1 Picasso.

Meredith Adams takes on a case that will take her into the crazed world of a narcisistic sociopath.

The case will become a lingering nightmare that will forever permeate her rare sleeping hours.

We find her,  tormented by her previous choices. She appears to hover in a wasteland of indecision. Until …

“Agent Adams, what is it about this particular case that troubles you so deeply?”

I can’t recall a time when I have ever felt so utterly helpless. I’m trapped by decisions I’ve made, decisions crafted by my own belief that our justice system with all its inherent faults must be upheld.

Yet I know that nothing we can do will ever change the fact that sixteen girls have had their futures irrevocably altered.

“Do you now regret those choices, Agent Adams?”

Regret? Dear Lord, you have no idea. You need to understand something. To you these girls are just tragic photographs that shocked you just for as long as it took something else horrific to appear on your screens.

They will never be just images to me. They have become my friends. I’ve watched them struggle to survive, and I’ve watched on in rage and sadness as six of them lost that struggle

So, regret doesn’t even begin to come close. This thing gnaws away at my innards like a ravenous cancer. There is not one night in recent memory that I don’t still see their mutilated fourteen year old faces. I still hear their torment.

“If there were a way for you seek retribution, would you take that path?”

“Well, would you, Agent Adams?

I’m sorry, this interview is now at an end.

“Just one more question, Agent Adams?”

“Agent Adams … ?”

“I apologise. My guest appears to have left the room.”

You’ll discover the outcome inside the pages of “The Alternative”

Karma has no deadline.

I do hope you’ll join me.

My thanks again to my supportive host.

My thanks to the marvelous crew at 4Wills Publishing for arranging my blog tour.

I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

“The Alternative” NOW Available Amazon.com

 

Author Bio:

Suzanne Burke resides with her daughter and grandson in a small country town located hundreds- of miles to the west of her previous home in Sydney Australia.

Suzanne had long wanted to write, life interrupted and she didn’t begin her journey into the world of writing until she was in her early fifties.

Suzanne has written her memoirs under the author name of Stacey Danson, both her non-fiction books have ranked in the top 100 paid in Kindle on Amazon. “Empty Chairs” and “Faint Echoes of Laughter” continue to earn wonderful reviews.

Suzanne writes her powerful Thrillers “Acts Beyond Redemption” and “Acts of Betrayal” and her Paranormal anthology “Mind-Shaft” as S. Burke.

 

Amazon Author Page

On TWITTER.

On Facebook.

My Blog

“This tour sponsored by 4WillsPublishing.wordpress.com.”

 

Introducing #RRBC Spotlight Author Jan Sikes!

Greetings! It is my pleasure to share my blog today with the June 2018 Rave Reviews Book Club Spotlight Author. Jan Sikes is not just a fellow author, she is somebody that I am honored to call my friend! Take it away, Jan…

THE CONVICT AND THE ROSE

 The second book in the series was, without a doubt, the hardest to write. This book required extensive research and countless hours spent poring over letters and writings from Rick’s hand. I wanted to get it “right.” And, since I wasn’t personally present for the majority of the prison scenes, I had to rely on stories he’d told me and writings he left behind.

I even called Leavenworth Prison and spoke to the Social Director to confirm some facts about the recording studio Rick built inside.

The other challenge was bouncing back-and-forth between Luke in Prison in Kansas and Darlina in Texas. Keeping the timeline straight brought about more than one re-write.

But, the end result is a book I am proud of, that has garnered thirty-four Five-Star reviews.

 

Here is the back cover blurb:

 

Award-winning Biographical/Fiction sequel to Flowers and Stone. Luke and Darlina find their love severely tested as they struggle to overcome enormous odds.

When Texas veteran musician, Luke Stone, finds himself behind bars with a seventy-five-year sentence, he is filled with hate, anger, and rebelliousness. He’s lost everything that he treasures, including the woman who holds his heart.

How has it come down to this? He’s spent his entire life writing songs and making music, filling dance halls and bars from Texas to California. But, when he refuses to tell the FBI what he knows about certain bank robberies that he possesses knowledge of, they make sure he pays dearly.

Broken and alone, in a prison of her own, Darlina Flowers struggles to find a way to live without the man she loves so completely.

Over the next sixteen years, Luke and Darlina each search for ways to somehow survive the fate life has hurled them into.

In an effort to dull the pain of living with only half a heart, Darlina gets involved in drugs, then follows a guru and tries different relationships, but nothing fills the void.

Several years pass before Luke makes up his mind that prison will not break him. He crawls up from the bottom one tiny step at a time, determined to be and do something worthwhile and discovers artistic talents he never realized he had.

The Convict and the Rose inspires hope and shows how anyone can turn a negative dark situation into a positive one. But more importantly, the story portrays a love that goes beyond earthly confines and proves how persistence and faith come with their own sweet reward.

Join Luke and Darlina as they continue their epic journey with love as their constant North Star and freedom as the driving force.

 

PURCHASE LINK

 

 

CONNECT WITH JAN:

 

 

TWITTER    FACEBOOK    BLOG    WEBSITE    LINKEDIN    PINTEREST     

 

Thank you for taking this RRBC SPOTLIGHT AUTHOR tour with me! See you at the next stop.

 

Letting Inspiration Take the Wheel

 

What drives my spirit? That is such a wonderful question. So often we live life in the past, nursing ancient grudges and scarred-over wounds inflicted by those for whom we once cared, or it’s spent reliving some special moment in time when all seemed right in the world. We focus so much on the past—and even the future—that we forget to appreciate the present. As writers, we can use those old wounds as plot lines for another compelling story, a life-affirming essay, or a cautionary tale. As human beings, we must learn to live for today before our time here is finished. We must seek balance. Living life in the here-and-now is what truly drives my spirit. We are not promised tomorrow, and yesterday cannot be relived. But just look at all the inspiration to be discovered today!

 

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Letting Inspiration Take the Wheel

What drives your spirit? It’s a simple enough question—though the answers can be quite complicated. As writers, inspiration is that very substance that leads us on our journey of telling believable stories. But what about those who don’t write?

Inspiration drives my spirit. And not just the writer side of me, either. Through three of my young nieces, I have been inspired to giggle like a schoolboy again. These lovely girls just have that sort of charm. We lost their father—my youngest brother—some years ago. This loss came rather suddenly, and, for the most part, unexpectedly. As a then-forty-three-year-old man, that news knocked a hole in the very center of me. I took the loss rather personally. What the heck were all those prayers for if they’d only gone ignored? And I wasn’t the only one praying for my brother. I went into a dark place afterward, found myself angry and confused. I all but abandoned my prayer life. I mean, what’s the sense of praying if God either won’t listen or just says no? (For the record, I still believe in prayer.)

To say my brother had a talent for making babies would be an accurate statement. He left nine children fatherless when he passed away—including a newborn baby boy who will never know his father. But these girls, they were five, seven, and eight at the time. They knew their father. They would certainly miss him in ways none of us will ever comprehend without having lost a parent at such young years. These same girls are beautiful and silly and kind and so full of life. It’s that silliness that is infectious. They make me laugh. But even more so, they make me giggle—much like a schoolboy. They’ve not forgotten their daddy. They’ve just bounced back the way kids will. They see there is still life left to be lived. They’ve quietly inspired me to follow suit.

They need not be tragic, those circumstances driving our spirits. Some of my greatest inspirations have been found languishing in boxes beneath tables at so many yard sales. A 1965 telephone directory for my home town led to the writing of one of my most-read essays. I mean, think about it: A telephone book. Who writes about that sort of thing?

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Consider the lost history found in the pages of that directory and you’ll see where inspiration stirred her magic inside of me. My father, a young newlywed and first-time dad, is forever a nineteen-year-old with his entire future ahead of him between those pages. Restaurants that catered to my parents’ generation are still open for business within those musty pages. Long-dead relatives remain alive at former addresses that, in the real world, no longer exist. This time capsule conjures all sorts of soul-driving inspiration. It can lead one to write essays or short stories based on such a find. It can also inspire a deep inward examination of self. Have I lived up to their legacies? Am I reaching accomplishments of which my lost ancestors would be proud? I think so—at least at this point in my life. See, my grandfather and father, both deceased, were aspiring writers. They found inspiration to craft short stories and, in the case of my grandfather, a memoir of his teen years, working aboard a Mississippi River paddle wheel steamboat. Neither my father nor grandfather ever found fulfillment in seeing their work published. I have to believe they’d both be thrilled to know I succeeded in that area.

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I believe inspiration dwells among the living, daring us to seek it, to discover it, to make it our very own, allowing it to drive our spirits to greater heights.

A few years ago, I moved to the country after years of living within the city limits. Night time in the country, out among corn and soy bean fields, is vastly different from night time for city dwellers. In the city, there are lights everywhere, making it next to impossible to look up and admire God’s handy work. But there are no lights—outside of the moon—here in the country. I find myself stepping out to the back patio or to the front porch many nights, just to look up at the millions of stars flung against the expanse of an inky-black sky. It’s a simple pleasure, really, but one I have come to truly cherish. This, too, inspires me. The night sky has a way of making even the biggest soul feel small and insignificant. It puts life and the cares of living into a proper perspective. These are the same stars the ancients gazed upon thousands of years ago. Three wise men searching for the newly-born Messiah used the brightest of these stars to guide their way. Ancient Egyptians built temples and ascribed names to these same heavenly bodies. Sailors relied upon these beacons to lead them to brave new worlds beyond the shores to which they’d been born.

Those stars will still be here long after all of us are dead and forgotten.

Did somebody mention the dead? Yes indeed. Even obituaries offer some of the greatest inspiration to those of us left behind. And you need not have even known the deceased. Obituaries are often small biographies detailing lives lived to the fullest. A few years ago I stumbled across a death notice of a woman named Merrien Josephine Cushman-Vail. Merrien died at age 100. That in itself is quite an accomplishment. One hundred years? Just imagine the things she witnessed during her time on planet Earth. But it’s her childhood story that really grabbed hold of my spirit and demanded an essay from me.

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In any good story there is that jumping-off point, that one big moment that sets the stage for what’s to come. For Merrien Josephine Cushman, that big moment came a few weeks before her 14th birthday way back in 1927. The young girl had achieved excellent marks, and because of this, there’d been no need of her presence in class on a fateful May day. She offered to walk her 7-year-old brother, Ralph, to school that morning, the way she normally did. But the boy declined his big sister’s gesture, not wanting the other kids to tease him.

Merrien had busied herself picking flowers when she heard the explosion that ended her little brother’s life.

On May 18, 1927, a disgruntled 55-year-old school board treasurer, angry over his defeat in the spring 1926 election for township clerk, rained mayhem upon the tiny community of Bath, Michigan. Andrew Kehoe had spent the better part of a year quietly hiding dynamite and incendiary pyrotol in the basement of the Bath Consolidated School. A timing device ignited the horror that quiet May morning, killing 45 people, 38 of which were children, while injuring 58.

In today’s world, such acts of inhumanity seem almost commonplace. Grief counselors are often on call to help children deal with the unimaginable. But way back in 1927, there existed no such occupation as grief counselor. Survivors like Merrien were left to deal with the wounds and scars on their own. But deal with it, Merrien did. She went on to enjoy a full and happy life, marrying Clare Vail and raising a family of five daughters and two sons.

“You just have to make up your mind to get through it, if you want to go on,” she told her children whenever they’d experienced tough times. “There’s no other choice.”

I wrote an essay inspired by this amazing woman. And had it not been for her obituary, I may not have found that spark needed to start the creative fire.

 

A pair of great song writers have claimed dreams as inspiration for some of their master works. Paul Simon tells the story of the way many of his best songs came to him while he slept. He’d wake in the morning and there they’d be, sitting front and center in his mind, just waiting for his guitar to add melody and texture to those words sown like seeds in the night.

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Paul McCartney has listed numerous points of inspiration for his immense catalog of music. The song “Yesterday” came to him in his sleep. The melody had such a familiar feel, he became convinced it belonged to some other musician, a song heard on the radio perhaps. The same can be said for another of McCartney’s greatest compositions. But this time a lyric in his song “Let It Be” supposedly came to him in a dream featuring his late mother Mary. According to Sir Paul, he’d been wrestling with the idea of leaving The Beatles. The way he saw it, they’d run their course. Cracks had long formed within the band, causing divisions and hard feelings. Should he stay or should he go? That question found its answer in his mother’s otherworldly admonition to just let it be.

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I suppose that’s just the way the soul works in some people. John Lennon’s brilliantly nonsense-laden gem “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds” is the result of a simple drawing his young son Julian had conjured of a girl in his class.

George Harrison wrote the beautiful “Here Comes the Sun” one early spring morning while sitting in his garden playing guitar with friend Eric Clapton. When inspiration arrives, greet it with open arms and a ready pen.

Without inspiration, human beings go nowhere, see nothing, and contribute little—if anything at all—to society. In the absence of creativity, the soul withers and dies long before the body will. Think of any single invention man has ever created and there will be some person, notion, or purpose that has inspired the inventor.

What about those creative souls that wow the world before vanishing from our collective conscience? One hit wonders, is what society has branded them. Look at Harper Lee, who wrote one of the greatest novels in the history of writing and then offered nothing else. Sure, there’s a “new” release from the storyteller, though that seems to be a manuscript written before To Kill A Mockingbird.

How many musicians have written that one great song, only to find an empty tank when seeking to create their follow-up? Does inspiration dry up? Does it die? Has it left us for another? Inspiration certainly changes because our appreciation changes. As we grow older, wisdom takes root within us. A subject we may write about as young people may not be something we hold onto any longer as we age. Those songs about young love and partying and living a carefree existence are entertaining when written by a young soul. But let’s face it: The songs Taylor Swift writes and sings would come off as ridiculous coming from an older soul like Loretta Lynn.

TAYLOR-SWIFT

Inspiration never dies or leaves us. It changes as we grow up. Those who fail to recognize such changes will eventually wither and fade. We begin to compete with self, attempting to re-capture the same processes that went into those early creations that helped establish who we are as writers or musicians or actors or inventors. An audience, no matter how loyal, will always see when a soul has ceased growing.

A quote from the late author Jackie Collins implores us scribes to write what we know. That sounds fine on the surface. After all, if we are ignorant of a subject, why take the chance of coming off a fool? But if our world is limited due to circumstances beyond our control, our work will reflect that need for experience and thus may be found lacking. Inspiration allows us to step out from under those constraints. It is inspiration that pushes us to investigate a matter. Research is itself a great fuel in driving the soul to create. I knew very little of the Roaring Twenties or Mississippi or New Orleans or jazz music—until inspired to research these subjects for my novel Jazz Baby. The deeper I dug down, the more inspired I became. The past came alive before my eyes. Books and photos and old music recordings sprinkled flavors throughout my imagination, breathing life into the story I intended to tell. I learned about these things so I could write about these things. That’s how creativity works.

A well-told story is, to me, one of the greatest joys on planet Earth. By well-told, I don’t mean proper punctuation or sentence construction or even strong writing mechanics. A well-told story is simply one that is believable. The characters are so real and so vivid the readers begin to care about your protagonist. They begin to despise or pity your antagonist, even viewing that character with suspicion. The story will read as a truthful recounting of some event that has its roots in your spirit, your mind, and no place else. A well-told story will transport us to faraway lands while transforming our own opinions on a matter we’ve maybe never really considered. It will burn itself into the psyche, forever remaining mere steps from our thoughts.

I’ve read several amazing books that remain with me in this fashion: The Poisonwood Bible, Winter’s Bone, The End of Alice. Every so often, a scene from one of these masterpieces will disrupt my thoughts, usually unbidden, and remind me why it is I enjoyed reading that particular work. When that happens, I’ll grab one of those lives from my box of books, and begin again thumbing those pages, sampling portions of brilliance, often discovering some great line or scene I may not have appreciated during that initial reading.

What drives my spirit? Life and the effort required to live it to its fullest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Q&A with Jane Marlow, author of How Did I Get Here? Book 2 in the Petrovo series

Greetings, dear readers. It is my pleasure and honor to introduce to you Jane Marlow, author of the soon-to-be-released historical fiction novel How Did I Get Here? Book 2, the Petrovo Series. This book will be available on May 8.

 

 

A Q&A with Jane Marlow, author of How Did I Get Here? Book 2 in the Petrovo series

 

  1. What inspired you to write How Did I Get Here?

 

While I was conducting research for the first novel in the Petrovo series, Who Is to Blame, I kept bumping into this thing called the Crimean War. Eventually, I realized it simply had to be the backdrop of my next novel for two reasons. First, the Crimean War was the guinea pig for a myriad of innovations that forever changed the face of warfare. The second factor that grabbed my attention and wouldn’t let go was the War’s magnitude as a gruesomely ugly historical reality.  Not only was the carnage on the battlefield hideous, but an even greater number of fatalities were attributable to disease, malnutrition, winter exposure, and lack of competent leadership. Not until World War I would more people die as victims of war.

 

  1. What led to your fascination with Russia in the 1800s?

 

I trace my interest back to 6th grade when mother dragged me kicking and screaming to a professional stage performance of Fiddler on the Roof. But as my feet began tapping with the music, I experienced the proverbial smack-to-the-forehead. I was just at the right age to gain an inkling of understanding about prejudice, suppression, rural culture, and the deep-seated role of religion.

 

  1. You researched the book thoroughly. Did you know when you started how extensive your research would become?

 

Research turned out to be a little more problematic than I expected. Although I located a modest number of books and articles, the Crimean War doesn’t play a prominent role in US history, and I was left with many uncertainties. I attempted to locate a graduate student in the US who would proofread my manuscript for historical accuracy but found no takers. I ended up consulting with the Crimean War Research Society in the U.K. I’m particularly grateful for their expertise for the chapter that took place at the Malakov bastion.

 

  1. What is one of your favorite stories or details about life in 19th century Russia?

 

While conducting research, I was taken aback by the fact that prostitution was a regulated business in Russia during the 1800s. For example, in order to control syphilis and other venereal diseases, prostitutes were required to be examined periodically. Their customers, however, had no such obligation. The policy seems akin to placing a dam half-way across the river, doesn’t it?  My third book in the Petrovo series offers readers an insider’s view of a Russian brothel.

 

  1. Where did you begin your research and where did it lead you? Any advice for other authors writing historical fiction?

 

My research began way back in the late 1980s. Because the Internet wasn’t an option in those days, I scoured the library for books and articles. Thank goodness for the Interlibrary Loan program! I also took a sightseeing trip to Russia which included spending time in the rural farmland that serves as the setting for my fictional village of Petrovo. Nowadays, I’d urge any historical fiction writer to befriend their local librarians. They know the ins and outs of the various online databases.

 

 

  1. What was it like writing from the perspective of a male character? Any challenges?

Such a daunting undertaking for a senior-citizen woman to plunge herself into the mindset of a young, virile male! One tool I used was to read and reread Jonathan Tropper’s novels. His flawed, lustful protagonists crack me up!

 

  1. What distinguishes How Did I Get Here? from other narratives about the Crimean War?

 

American authors have produced very little in the way of fiction set in the Crimean War; therefore, it’s a wide-open canvas. Second, my novel doesn’t end with the war. It shows a veteran’s struggle with the then unnamed consequence of war, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Third, as a veterinarian, I felt compelled to demonstrate the agony war inflicts on animals. My eyes tear up every time I read my own passage in which the protagonist has to kill a horse that was injured in battle.

 

  1. As a writer, how do you weave fact and fiction into a novel?

 

Conceptually, it’s easy if your mind is prone to flights of fancy. However, meticulous research and double-checking is required if the characters are well-known persons or if the setting is a well-documented event.

 

This particular book presented an additional challenge. During the 1800s, Russia used what is known as the Old Style calendar (O.S.), which is 12 days behind the Western New Style (N.S.) calendar. Hence, historical Russian events are often dated along the lines of “Oct 24 O.S. (Nov 5 N.S.).”

 

Imagine being an author (i.e., me) doing research on a war in which one of the military forces used Old Style while the opponents used New Style. Additionally, some authors mark their books, articles, and online resources with either N.S. or O.S., but other authors don’t deem it necessary to specify which calendar style they use. Then try to coordinate actual events (some N.S., some O.S.) into a fictional narrative in which timing was crucial to the story. My sanity underwent a notable decline in during this period of writing.

 

  1. Were there any unexpected obstacles you encountered when you began writing How Did I Get Here?

 

The same aspect that I hope will attract readers—a story about a little known but ghastly war—was also a hurdle—finding detailed depictions from the Russians’ point of view.

 

  1. What do you hope your readers will get out of the novel?

 

My desire is that readers find several take-home messages:

 

First, the old adage, “Beauty is only skin deep.”

 

Second, malevolence and injustice can mold a child, but fortitude plus a helping hand can remake the man.

 

Third, every person is obligated to give back to society. And not just according to what he received from it, but at a higher level.

 

Fourth, a better understanding of the demons of war as manifested in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

 

 

  1. Who’s a character from the book you wish you could meet?

 

I relish 10-year-old Platon’s inquisitiveness, boundless energy, and joie de vivre. In fact, I’d adopt him if I could. But since I can’t, I’m entertaining the possibility of writing a book with him as the protagonist, so I can watch him mature into a man.

 

  1. What was your favorite novel growing up?

 

By the time I reached junior high, I was ready to put the Nancy Drew series behind me. Being a typical girlie-girl, I was forever enamored by the first adult, mainstream novel I read, Gone with the Wind.

 

  1. What authors/books do you draw inspiration from?

 

If only I could be as talented a writer as Pulitzer Prize-winner Richard Russo!. During a seminar on writing fiction, the instructor told us that taking pen in hand and writing and re-writing good passages from favorite books would promote brain neuron connections that would improve our own writing. I must have copied the same passage from Nobody’s Fool at least 200 times!

 

  1. Can we expect more books in the Petrovo series?

 

You bet! The third novel in the series will offer an insider’s view of the seamier side of 1870s Moscow.

 

  1. Where can readers find your books and learn more about you?

 

       Both novels are available in paper, Kindle, and Audible formats on Amazon. If your local bookstore doesn’t stock the book, request that it be ordered.

 

For more about me as an author, plus a few chuckles from Slavic Slapstick, as well as jaw-dropping tidbits about historic Russia, visit my blog at www.janemarlowbooks.com, and subscribe to my free, no sales gimmicks, no obligation e-newsletter with quarterly in-box delivery.

 

 

 

PRESS CONTACT

Elena Meredith | PR by the Book

512-481-7096 | elena@prbythebook.com

The #RRBC “TREAT” Reads Blog Hop

Greeting:  Welcome to the first ever “TREAT” Reads Blog Hop!   These members of RRBC have penned and published some really great reads and we’d like to honor and showcase their talent.  Although there were maybe 3-4 winners who were previously on this list who are no longer with the club, now all of the listed Winners are RWISA members!  Way to go RWISA!

 

We ask that you pick up a copy of the title listed and after reading it, leave a review.  There will be other books on tour for the next few days, so please visit the HOP’S main page to follow along.

 

Also, for every comment that you leave along this tour, including on the HOP’S main page,, your name will be entered into a drawing for an amazing gift card to be awarded at the end of the tour!

Book:  THE IMPROBABLE JOURNEYS OF BILLY BATTLE 

Blurb:   Billy Battles is definitely not in Kansas anymore. 

As Book 2 of the Finding Billy Battles trilogy opens, Billy is far from his Kansas roots and his improbable journeys are just starting. 

The year is 1894 and Billy is aboard the S S China sailing to the inscrutable Far East. Trouble is not far behind. He has met a mysterious and possibly dangerous German Baroness. He has locked horns with malevolent agents of the German government and battled ferocious Chinese and Malay pirates in the South China Sea. 

Later, he is embroiled in the bloody anti-French insurgency in Indochina–which quite possibly makes him the first American combatant in a country that eventually will become Vietnam. Then, in the Philippines, he is thrust into the Spanish-American War and the brutal anti-American insurgency that follows. But Billy’s troubles are only beginning. 

As the 19th century ends and the 20th century begins, he finds himself entangled with political opportunists, spies, revolutionaries, and an assortment of vindictive and dubious characters of both sexes. How will Billy handle those people and the challenges they present? The answers are just ahead.

Author:  Ron Yates

This blog hop sponsored by:  4WillsPublishing