Celebrating the Release of The Haunting of Chatham Hollow #NewRelease

It is my honor to host a pair of exceptionally gifted authors on The Indie Spot today. Please welcome Mae Clair and Staci Troilo.

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Beem, thank you so much for hosting me today. I’m delighted to be here with you and your readers to share The Haunting of Chatham Hollow. I co-authored this novel with Staci Troilo, and thoroughly enjoyed the experience. It was amazing to work with a co-author, especially someone as talented as Staci. She and I found we work great together, so who knows—maybe another down the road.

For now, we hope others will enjoy our supernatural mystery which includes dual timelines, ghostly happenings, a town curse, murder, and rumors of buried gold.  During our short promo tour, you’ll meet several characters who populate the book. Today, I’d like to introduce sisters Irene Chatham and Dorinda Orrman from the 1888 timeline. Spiritualism is a key thread in the book, so Staci and I thought we’d have each character sit down with a medium as a way of introduction.

Let’s listen in.

SPIRTUALIST: Welcome ladies. I understand you’re both avid followers of the Spiritualist movement.

IRENE CHATHAM:  Avid may be too strong a word, but we both certainly enjoy exploring the possibilities an accredited medium brings.

DORINDA ORRMAN: Are you going to do a reading for us?

SPIRTUALIST: If you’d like. But I thought perhaps we could chat first. I understand you’ve already had several sessions.

IRENE: Indeed. I introduced Dorinda to both Victor Rowe and Benedict Fletcher.

DORINDA: Not that I wasn’t already acquainted with the practice of spiritualism. It tends to have a more robust following at home.

SPIRTUALIST: (raising an eyebrow) Then you’re not from these parts?

DORINDA: New York City.

SPIRTUALIST: I imagine Chatham Hollow feels… quaint.

IRENE: (in a low, disgruntled voice) Which she constantly reminds me of.

DORINDA: (turning a sharp gaze on her sister) Did you say something, Irene?

IRENE: Just that I know you miss New York.

DORINDA: True. My girls do, too.

SPIRTUALIST: Girls?

DORINDA: My daughters, Elayne and Shelley. Elayne is the main reason we’re here. It’s a rather embarrassing situation, but I think the change has been good for her. (abruptly sitting straighter) But we needn’t discuss such unpleasantries. Irene has certainly made my visit intriguing. I was most taken with the dinner gathering she held, inviting both Mr. Rowe and Mr. Fletcher.

IRENE: Of course, I would host something upscale, dear. I am the first lady of Chatham Hollow—the mayor’s wife.

DORINDA (in a low, disgruntled voice) A position you seem inordinately taken with.

IRENE: (turning a sharp gaze on her sister) Did you say something, Dorinda?

DORINDA: Just that I know how pleased you were with the way that evening turned out. (shifts her attention to the spiritualist) Mr. Fletcher summoned our dear departed mother to speak with Irene. Afterward, Mr. Rowe—well, it was simply amazing what he did.

SPIRTUALIST: I’m intrigued. What exactly did he do?

DORINDA: An automatic writing in which he channeled my husband, Harold, deceased for the last six years. The words “green valise” were penned over and over.

SPIRTUALIST: What does that mean?

DORINDA: I’m sorry. Even thinking about it makes me weep. (growing teary-eyed and standing). Perhaps we should do this another time.

SPIRTUALIST: But I wanted to ask you about the Founder’s Day séance.

DORINDA: I wasn’t even there. I had to return to New York, but from what I’ve heard… (she shoots a glance at Irene). I think that séance will be something people in Chatham Hollow talk about for centuries to come.

____________

 BLURB:

One founding father.
One deathbed curse.
A town haunted for generations.

Ward Chatham, founder of Chatham Hollow, is infamous for two things—hidden treasure and a curse upon anyone bold enough to seek it. Since his passing in 1793, no one has discovered his riches, though his legend has only grown stronger.

In 1888, charlatan Benedict Fletcher holds a séance to determine the location of Chatham’s fortune. It’s all a hoax so he can search for the gold, but he doesn’t count on two things—Victor Rowe, a true spiritualist who sees through his ruse, and Chatham’s ghost wreaking havoc on the town.

More than a century later, the citizens of the Hollow gather for the annual Founder’s Day celebration. A paranormal research team intends to film a special at Chatham Manor, where the original séance will be reenacted. Reporter and skeptic Aiden Hale resents being assigned the story, but even he can’t deny the sudden outbreak of strange happenings. When he sets out to discover who or what is threatening the Hollow—supernatural or not— his investigation uncovers decades-old conflicts, bitter rivalries, and ruthless murders.

This time, solving the mystery isn’t about meeting his deadline. It’s about not ending up dead.

Thanks again for hosting me today, Beem. It was a pleasure to drop by—along with my unnamed spiritualist and Irene and Dorinda. (Please excuse the sisters. They love each other but experience their share of friction). I invite your readers to pick up a copy of The Haunting of Chatham Hollow at the link below. Staci and I both appreciate the support and wish everyone happy reading!

PURCHASE LINK

Connect with Mae Clair at BOOKBUB and the following haunts:

Amazon| BookBub| Newsletter Sign-Up
Website | Blog| Twitter| Goodreads| All Social Media

Connect with Staci Troilo at the following haunts:

Website | Blog | Social Media | Newsletter
Amazon ​| BookBub ​| Goodreads

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84 thoughts on “Celebrating the Release of The Haunting of Chatham Hollow #NewRelease

  1. Mae Clair

    Beem, thank you so much for hosting me today. Staci and I are delighted to be making the rounds with our new release, and appreciate the opportunity to share The Haunting of Chatham Hollow with your readers!

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
  2. Marcia

    Thanks for hosting Staci and Mae, Beem! Great post, great excerpt, and up NEXT in my TBR pile! I’m very much looking forward to this one, and this post is one of the reasons why!

    Mae & Staci, here’s hoping this one will fly like an eagle, and result in oodles and oodles of sales! 🤗💖🤗

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
  3. Jan Sikes

    This is excellent! It shows the somewhat bitter rivalry between the two sisters. I enjoyed each of their characters in the story but didn’t have much tolerance for Dorinda’s belittling. 🙂 Another great look at this fabulous story! Congratulations, Mae and Staci. Thank you, Beem, for hosting!

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. Mae Clair

      Jan, I had such fun writing these character posts and allowing the personalities of the sisters to shine through in this one. They were both quite gone on themselves–especially Dorinda—weren’t they? LOL!

      Staci and I are so glad you enjoyed our tale!

      Liked by 3 people

      Reply
  4. Judi Lynn

    I just finished reading the 1888 seance scene with Fletcher. Wow! Ward Chatham makes for one scary ghost! I’m really enjoying the book. I’d have it finished by now if I could stay awake a little longer at night:)

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
  5. D. Wallace Peach

    Irene and Dorinda are great characters. I enjoy their sometimes contentious relationship, but also feel for both of them, for different reasons. The book is the best thing about heading up to bed. Congrats to Staci and Mae, and thanks for hosting, Beem.

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. Mae Clair

      Thanks so much, Jacquie. I love that you’re enjoying the book!!
      I do have a passion for writing the 1800s in fiction. I had so much fun with my sections and I know Staci did with hers!
      Thanks for sharing your thoughts! ❤️

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply

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